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The Mystery
This poem is ascribed to Amergin, a Milesian prince or druid who settled in Ireland hundreds of years before Christ
and is from the Leabhar Gabhala, or Book of Invasions. The poem is translated by Douglas Hyde (see note below).
I am the wind which breathes upon the sea,
I am the wave of the ocean,
I am the murmur of the billows,
I am the ox of the seven combats,
I am the vulture upon the rocks,
I am the beam of the sun,
I am the fairest of plants,
I am the wild boar in valour,
I am a salmon in the water,
I am a lake in the plain,
I am a word of science,
I am the point of the lance of battle,
I am the God who created in the head the fire.
Who is it who throws light into the meeting on the mountain?
Who announces the ages of the moon?
Who teaches the place where couches the sun?
                                     (If not I)
"The three short pieces of verse ascribed to Amergin are certainly very ancient and very strange.  But as the whole story of the Milesian Invasion is wrapped in mystery and is quite possibly a rationalized account of early Irish mythology no faith can be placed in the alleged date or genuineness of Amergin's verses.  They are of interest, because as Irish tradition has them as being the first verses made in Ireland, so it may very well be they actually do present the oldest surviving lines of any vernacular tongue in Europe except Greece." by Douglas Hyde, The Story of Early Gaelic Literature
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(c) 2001 Don Schwager